Tag Archives: rare

How to Grow and Flower Indestructible Hoyas

By Laurelynn Martin and Byron Martin

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Giant Wax Plant

The genus hoya, commonly called Wax Plant, is a large group of mostly climbing or trailing vines, or sometimes shrubs native to tropical Asia, the Pacific Islands and Australia.

 

Native Habitat:
They are most often found growing as epiphytes in tropical forests where they climb up into or hang from the branches amongst the mix of other epiphytic plants. As they often grow lower in the canopy, as well as at the tops of the tress, they have a great adaption to varying light levels.

Hoyas as Indoor Plants:
Hoyas are famous as indoor houseplants because they can tolerate very dry conditions. This comes from their epiphytic nature where they can go through a dry season with little, if any, rain for months at a time, surviving on the air moisture and dew at night. When given favorable growing conditions, they will flower with a wide variety of colors and flower sizes from the tiny ¼” in diameter for each flower to the giants up to 4” in diameter per flower. The blooms often form clusters or umbels of many flowers although some are singular. Some hoya flowers have a waxy appearance; others are fragrant.

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Growing Begonia ‘Autumn Ember’ p.p.a.f. (Begonia rhizomatous hybrid)

By Laurelynn Martin and Byron Martin

begonia autumn ember

Begonias are some of the easiest plants to grow in containers in a home environment. Our newest hybrid, ‘Autumn Ember’ has taken the begonia world by storm with its brilliant orange leaves. This rhizomatous begonia hybrid is a cross between Begonia ‘Marmaduke’ and Begonia ‘Angel Glow.’ Selected out of a group of seedlings, ‘Autumn Ember’ shows the brightest orange coloring, especially when they are newly emerging as juvenile leaves. When grown with other begonias, ‘Autumn Ember’ literally glows in comparison and when seen from afar, the mass of orange leaves catches the attention of all who gaze upon it.

Growth Habit:
Medium-sized leaves spread by rhizomes and can be pinched to create a well-branched bushy form. The color intensity of the leaves depends on the amount of light. In the wintertime, we have noticed there is no green at all, and believe it is the quality of light at that time that turns the leaves orange. The older leaves will eventually fade and soften in color.

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Grow Coffee, Tea, Chocolate and Other Popular Beverage Plants

By Laurelynn Martin and Byron Martin

Roselle Jamaican Hibiscus (Hibiscus sabdariffa)

Roselle Jamaican Hibiscus (Hibiscus sabdariffa)

Popular beverages, such as Coffee (Coffea Arabica), Tea (Camellia sinensis), and Cocoa (Theobroma cacao), are world renown and easy plants to grow and harvest. A couple more plants that we recommend adding to your favorite beverage list are Yerba Mate’ (Ilex paraguariensis) much like green tea loaded with anti-oxidants, and Roselle Hibiscus Tea (Hibiscus sabdariffa), which is high in Vitamin C.

Let’s start with a well-known plant like coffee. The enjoyment and ritual around a morning cup of coffee has become an obsession, and now people drink coffee throughout the day. Growing your own coffee beans is fun and easy for the gardener.

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Check out our video on growing your own coffee and  Visit our You Tube channel for more great video’s on growing all types of tasty tropical treats!

How to Grow your own Coffee 

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Filed under Chocolate Plant, coffee, container fruits, Growing Tasty Tropical Plants, meyer lemon, Theobroma Cacao

Grow The Largest Flower in The World- Corpse Flower (Amorphophallus titanum) A Plant Geek’s Biggest Challenge!

By Laurelynn Martin and Byron Martin

The Corpse Flower, Amorphophallus titanum, is a single inflorescence that reaches an astounding height of 6-9’ tall. It only Corpse Flower flowers once every 7-8 years and only 3-5 blooming events, from plants grown in cultivation, happen worldwide each year. This rare plant is for plant geeks who want a challenge and will be committed to nearly a decade of nurturing and pampering this rare and attractive giant.

Origin
Corpse Flower was first found in the tropical forests of Sumatra where even there, it is rare in its native habitat. It is a member of the Aroid family and also known as the Titan Arum.

About the Bloom
The bloom is magnificent with its frilly-edged maroon petal completely circling the center spadix. It’s known as the Corpse Flower because of the raunchy smelling odor, similar to rotten meat, when in full bloom. However, this does attract the pollinators like flies and beetles in the wild. In cultivation, hand pollination is required. A beautiful seed stalk forms after the flower is pollinated…

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Growing Kumquats- The Pop-in-Your-Mouth Fruit

By Laurelynn Martin and Byron Martin

The Kumquat is thought to have originated in Southern Japan and China.  It was originally known as the “gam kwat” with an early reference in the 12th century. Fortunella margarita 'Nagami'Kumquats are loved for their oval, oblong or round tiny fruit that produce abundantly on small trees in the ground or prolifically in containers. The bite-size, pop-in-your-mouth fruit have edible skin.  Some varieties are sweet on the outside and tart on the inside; others are sweet all the way through. In 1864, Robert Fortune, a collector from the London Horticultural Society introduced kumquats to Europe, and shortly thereafter to North America. In 1915, Kumquats were no longer classified as Citrus japonica but were named after Mr. Fortune and the new genus became  Fortunella.

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