Tag Archives: plant care

Caring for Bare Root Plants

By Laurelynn Martin and Byron Martin

Persimmons Nikitas Gift

Persimmon ‘Nikita’s Gift’

Your bare root plants are ready to go into the garden as soon as you receive them. If you can’t plant immediately, store in a cool location or refrigerator for up to 1-2 weeks. Make sure the roots never dry out and don’t let the plants freeze. Temperatures above 50° will cause the plants to start budding out.

Prior to planting, soak the roots in water for 30 minutes to 12 hours. Fruiting plants need a full sun location with rich, fertile soil. Dig a hole that’s 2-3 times larger than the root ball. This increased room allows you to spread the roots out laterally on all sides. You can add compost to the planting hole but don’t add any chemical fertilizer into the hole as this can burn the roots. Back fill the hole with rich garden soil and tamp down well so the plant is secure. Make sure the entire root system is underground and the plant should be at the same depth in the soil where it was grown before. (You can see this on the stem.) If it is a grafted plant, the graft union needs to be above the soil. It helps to leave a small reservoir for water on top of the planting hole. This can also be filled with mulch to keep down weeds and reduce soil moisture evaporation.

Water well once your bare root plant is in the garden. Continue to water a couple of times a week if the soil is dry. It’s helpful to stake the young plant for support as it grows. If you are planting grape vines, these will need a trellis, arbor or fence for support since the vines can reach several feet long.
Start fertilizing 2-3 weeks after planting. You can apply liquid or granular fertilizer but make sure to stop the fertilization program by mid-August so the plant can harden off for the winter.

Remove any weeds growing around the base of the plant since these will compete with plants for water and nutrients.

To grow the strongest plants, it’s best to pinch off fruit for the first year or two to allow plants to grow vigorously and become strong so they have more fruiting potential for their lifetime.

For more information, call Logee’s Customer Service 888-330-8038. Or go to our website http://www.logees.com/care

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The Joy and Ease of Growing Air Plants

By Laurelynn Martin and Byron Martin

Spanish Moss

Spanish Moss

Tillandsias, or air plants, are easy to grow and add dimension, color and texture to any gardening space. With over 730 species in the Tillandsia genus, they are mostly native to Central and South America. Also known as epiphytes, tillandsias thrive without soil and attach to other plants or trees. They are in the Bromeliad family. Some grow in the desert but the ones we are focusing on are generally found in the understory of a tropical forest. Nutrients and water are absorbed through the leaves. The thin leaved tillandsias are usually in the rain forest and the thicker leaved ones grow in drier habitats. The roots, which are limited, are used to stabilize the plants on trees or other structures rather than to access water and nutrients.

Some like the Spanish moss are rootless. Spanish moss is an air plant but it is an exception to the tropical Tillandsias. Spanish moss can be grown outside in the North where temperatures dip down into the teens. With a limited root system, Spanish moss derives its nutrients and moisture from the air.

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How to Care for Grafted Plants and Understand their Special Needs

By Laurelynn Martin and Byron Martin

bloodorange_graft202

Grafted Blood Orange

It is important to understand how grafted plants are grown. Grafting is one way to propagate plants by joining two plants together to become a stronger, healthier plant. Although it is a little more complicated and time consuming than other propagation methods (like seeds or cuttings), it does solve some of the issues of reproducing particular cultivars that are grown for ornamental or agricultural uses. Logee’s sells many grafted plants including: adeniums, citrus, avocado, mango, persimmon, PawPaws, sapodilla and many more.

The Process of Grafting:
The grafting process involves taking two parts of a plant: the root system, or the understock, and the vegetative portion, or the scion. When two plants are closely related (the same genus or the same plant family), the root system (often a seedling or other specialty root system) and the vegetative portion (a twig or bud of a named variety) can be brought together to form a grafted union and create a new plant. Once the union takes, it allows the flow of water and nutrients through the vascular system of both pieces. This in turn joins the plant together and creates one plant.

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Choosing Containers, Pots and Vessels for your Plants

By Laurelynn Martin and Byron Martin

Containers, pots and vessels for plants have been around for thousands of years. They have become a well-loved art form and brokenmany times they are the focal point in garden rooms, patios and windowsills. In the United States, a glazed flowerpot dating back to 1750 from Norwich, Connecticut was thought to be the earliest pot in the U.S. but then a three-inch clay pot in a Spanish settlement on Parris Island, SC was unearthed dating back to 1569. The earliest flowerpot on record was first documented in 317-287 BC Athens, Greece. Whether beautiful hand thrown, rolled-rim terra cotta pots from Italy, glazed orchid pots from England, colorful plastic pots from China or earthen pots from the United States, we know one thing for sure and that is the obsession with pots is worldwide. There is no question that size, shape, color and form are players in the container gardening scene but our focus in this article is about the advantages and disadvantages of each container and their effects upon the plant.

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